George P. Matysek Jr. has been a member of the Catholic Review staff since 1997, and currently serves as the assistant managing editor.

A graduate of Our Lady of Mount Carmel High School in Essex, George holds a bachelor's degree in history and writing from what is now Loyola University Maryland in Baltimore and a master's degree in history from UMBC.

A winner of numerous regional, national and international journalism awards, George has reported from Guyana, Guatemala, Italy, Poland, Czech Republic and Hungary.

Reach George at gmatysek@CatholicReview.org

 

 

Archive

May 2015
December 2014
Go

Email Subscription

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Recent Comments

Thank you, Mr. George P. Matysek Jr. for your blog of May 5, 2015, "Mary gets her crown in Emmitsburg." The crowning of the campanile-cum-statue on the Mount of the Blessed Virgin Mary last May, with a huge wreath of silk flowers on her head pointed to her in time, her month of May, as well as spoke of our veneration of her as our Lord’s mother, the Mother of God, the Queen of Heaven. In this statuary pose she protectively overlooks the campus of St. Mary's University, whose heart lies in its Catholic identity. However, when I went to the "Board of Trustees Statement on Our Catholic Identity" at the 'msmary' web site and saw and reflected on its four tenets for this Catholic identity, no explicit or implicit mention of Mary was found. One of the four tenets did mention Ex corde eclessiae, the Apostolic Constitution on Catholic Universities of (now) Pope St. John Paul II, given in Rome on August 15, 1990, The Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into Heaven. That is the only explicit mention of Mary in this papal document. However, quoted from the first paragraph of the Introduction of this document: "A Catholic University's privileged task is "to unite existentially by intellectual effort two orders of reality that too frequently tend to be placed in opposition as though they were antithetical: the search for truth, and the certainty of already knowing the fount of truth"…" We already know the fount of truth, Jesus, through his mother, Mary. Ad Iesum per Mariam. This reality St. Bernadette Soubirous knew through the Apparitions of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Lourdes in 1858, a moment in Church history the Mount commemorates as home to the National Shrine Grotto of Lourdes (as well as to Mount St. Mary's Seminary). This reality and commemoration seem justification enough for serious consideration to be given to inclusion of Mary’s name per se in this statement of Catholic identity, for without her none of us comes to true and authentic conversion as the one that Jesus had made each one of us to be rather than that one which each one of us without her had tried to make himself or herself into.

VIEW POST

Thanks, Gwyneth! We all miss him at the Catholic Review.

VIEW POST
The Narthex

VIDEO REPORT: New deacons for Baltimore!

Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien ordained 14 new permanent deacons for the Archdiocese of Baltimore May 14 at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Homeland.  You can read all about it in next week's issue of The Catholic Review.  In the meantime, check out this video!

UPDATE: The story is posted here.



May 15, 2011 10:37
By George Matysek


VIDEO REPORT: Mount St. Mary's Seminary is booming

The Jan. 6 issue of The Catholic Review will feature a vocations story about an enrollment boom at Mount St. Mary's Seminary in Emmitburg. The nation's second-oldest Catholic seminary is putting up some impressive numbers and producing priests known for their passion and commitment to the church. Look for the story next month. In the meantime, check out this companion video report:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5sOUao0XC4]

December 28, 2010 07:05
By George Matysek


Nashville Dominicans in the national spotlight

NPR Photo

The Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia, the Nashville-based order of religious women who do a bang-up job running Mount de Sales Academy in Catonsville, are getting some national exposure. NPR recently featured the thriving congregation on "All Things Considered." The program reported that 27 women joined the Nashville Dominicans this year and 90 entered over the past five years.

A snip:

This is the Pope John Paul generation, coming of age. Of course, that may explain why they chose to enter a convent — but why this convent? Most visited several orders, and the novices nod as Sister Joan of Arc says the minute she met the Nashville Dominicans, she felt as if she had come home.

"I was blown away — seeing them in their habits, seeing their joyful witness, listening to them sing. Oh! It was captivating, it was so captivating," she says.

Of course, not everyone is cut out for this life, and a few drop out in the first two years.

"The day-to-day is hard," says (Beatrice) Clark, who is in her fifth year. "The day-to-day can be mundane in little stuff. But in the large choices, this is the most freeing thing I could have chosen, because everything else would have been trying to find this — this defining relationship that would give value to everything."

Including her work teaching sophomores at St. Cecilia Academy, where Clark is, on this fall day, grilling her students on The Scarlet Letter. Clark, who had planned to become a litigator, handles discussion like a cross examination, peppering the girls with questions and the girls firing their answers right back.

Catholic bishops beg the Nashville Dominicans to send their young sisters to their parochial schools, and more than 100 of them now teach in 34 schools in 13 states. The sisters are a big hit with the students as well because they don't fit the stereotype.

"You hear stories from your parents about getting spanked with rulers and stuff, and that's not true at all," says Breanne Lampert, one of Clark's sophomores. "But seeing the sisters here compared to other schools — they're so much younger. I don't know, they understand you really well."

"The young sisters are really inspiring," says Brady Diaz-Barriga, "because you're like, 'Oh, I could never do that. I just love Facebook and my cell phone and my computer too much to give that up!' But you see how much joy your life can be with less and not having all of that."

Isabelle Aparicio says the young sisters' lives have a surprising appeal. "Seeing these young women make these really hard decisions and then seeing so many of them make it, it's kind of inspiring," she says. "And it's actually made me think about it, possibly."

Much more here.

December 23, 2010 03:37
By George Matysek